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Tuesday, January 31, 2012

Power ultrasonic driver to do Ultrasonic drilling for Panaplex Displays

Tuning ultrasonic driver


Video Link...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=PwT69o41gm0


Ultrasonic cavitation in water


Video Link...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=OraziV7kkAU


Power ultrasonic driver (14/05/11)

Page last updated: 19/01/2012, 02:58:22 PM GMT
All content © Lindsay R. Wilson 2010 lindsay@imajeenyus.com
For trouble-free viewing, please ensure you are using the UTF-8 character encoding.

Introduction

On this page, I describe the construction of a power supply for a 70W ultrasonic tank transducer, and the machining & tuning of an aluminium horn. I originally started all this in order to do ultrasonic drilling, but could find no simple, cheap means of driving high-power transducers. "Proper" ultrasonic horns are usually made from titanium, and the power sources are usually fancy affairs with auto frequency tuning. However, I found that, for the power levels I'm interested in, an aluminium horn works perfectly well, and it is possible to drive the transducer with a manually-controlled oscillator and inverter. I won't go into too much detail on the principles behind piezoelectricity and these kind of ultrasonic transducers - I assume you know a bit of background since you're reading this.

I'm using a 28kHz, 70W bolt-clamped Langevin transducer (part number SMBLTD45F28H) which was bough from Steiner & Martin (http://www.steminc.com/) a few years ago for around $30-$40. For photos of it please scroll down or see their website. These are typically intended for ultrasonic cleaning, sonochemistry, low-power welding etc. On the surplus market, they can sometimes be found inside cleaning tanks.

Driving requirements - measuring impedance spectra



Read More...
http://www.imajeenyus.com/electronics/20110514_power_ultrasonic_driver/index.shtml

Ultrasonic drilling (16/05/11)

While I was making my second Panaplex display, I realised that an ideal means of forming cathode wire supports would be a piece of ceramic or glass with small holes drilled in it to hold the wires. The holes need to be sub-mm, and this is nearly impossible to do with conventional rotary diamond drills. Fortunately, there is a solution - ultrasonic drilling. This is widely used in lapidary for drilling small holes in stones, beads etc. for threading on to necklaces. As always, commercial setups are very expensive (around $3000), so I decided to have a bash at making my own, having already built a power ultrasonic driver.

The principle is very simple. An ultrasonic horn is used to vibrate a drillbit vertically. The drillbit can consist of nothing more than a piece of wire - I used standard household pins, which are steel and are around 0.7mm diameter. In the presence of an abrasive slurry, the pounding action of the drillbit tip causes the underlying material to chip away, gradually drilling a hole. It works best on brittle materials like glass and ceramics.

The photos show the setup I came up with.

Read More...
http://www.imajeenyus.com/workshop/20110516_ultrasonic_drilling/index.shtml


Second Panaplex display (15/11/10)

Introduction

After I'd built my first Panaplex display, I came across a beautiful example of a miniature commercial display which was used in desktop calculators. It's the Elfin Rodan MG-17, with a "D" or "G" suffix depending on the anode construction. The MG-17D has a wire mesh anode in front of the cathodes, like the vast majority of other Nixie and Panaplex displays. This is alright, but it is visible and tends to obscure the cathodes. However, the MG-17G has a sheet metal anode with apertures cut out which correspond to each cathode segment. The glow around the cathode is then confined to the opening in the plate. This construction looks much nicer (and is a bit easier to make) so I decided to go with it.

The three pages linked below have some great photos of both devices in operation. These are backup copies hosted on this site, with links to the original page source. (If you need to see the Japanese characters correctly, use the Shift_JIS encoding.)

  • MG-17D - Japanese page with photos of all numbers. This version has a mesh grid.
  • MG-17G - Japanese page with photos of all numbers. This version does not have a mesh anode.
  • MG-17G - Page from Dieter's tube archive with info on pinout and specifications

If you look closely at the MG-17G, you should be able to make out the construction. The cathodes are bent pieces of wire in the shape of staples, held in a ceramic or glass backplate. The lead-in wires are welded to the cathode wires behind the backplate and the anode is riveted to the front of the backplate. This is the structure I'm going to try and replicate.

A CAD drawing of the display is available here as a Rhino 3D file (version 4 of Rhino) or here as a PDF (scale 8:1).

Backplate

Read More...
http://www.imajeenyus.com/vacuum/20101115_second_panaplex/index.shtml



Power ultrasonic driver to do Ultrasonic drilling for Panaplex Displays
Powering an Ultrasonic Transducer - Hack a Day
Power ultrasonic driver
STEMINC PIEZO
Ultrasonic drilling
DSCN4116.JPG (JPEG Image, 1024x768 pixels)
Second Panaplex display
Panaplex display counting - YouTube
Ultrasonic cavitation in lemonade - YouTube
Tuning ultrasonic driver - YouTube
Ultrasonic cavitation in water - YouTube
Welcome to Imajeenyus
ƒjƒLƒV[ŠÇAB-5870S
MG-17G (Elfin Rodan) Nixie Röhre- Nixie Tube

I could spend days reading on this site!:) There's a bunch of interesting Projects and Home Made Tools.

Don


Check out the News page, or try one of the categories below:

Electronics Induction heating, power supplies, high voltage, making PCBs

Vacuum Low-pressure discharges, vacuum coating, pumps, hardware

Optical Homebuilt CO2 lasers, fluorescent things

Mechanical Steam engines, Stirling engines, assorted contraptions

Workshop Machines, hand tools, techniques

Mathematics Maths-related stuff

Chemistry Chemical stuff

Computer Computer and software stuff

Temporary page (my use only)

Page last updated: 19/01/2012, 02:58:22 PM GMT
All content © Lindsay R. Wilson 2010 lindsay@imajeenyus.com
For trouble-free viewing, please ensure you are using the UTF-8 character encoding.


Sunday, January 29, 2012

Ubuntu creator warns businesses to be wary of cloud lock-in - Techworld.com

Ubuntu creator warns businesses to be wary of cloud lock-in

Canonical and Citrix highlight the pitfalls of proprietary cloud computing

Cloud infrastructure was always meant to be based on open standards, and organisations that choose to buy capacity from public clouds that only support one standard are creating problems for themselves in the future, according to Ubuntu creator Canonical.

“All the world’s biggest clouds are built on open source technology,” said Canonical's vice president Chris Kenyon in a keynote session at Cloud Expo Europe yesterday. “They’re not all built on open standards, but open source underpins all of the largest plans.”

Kenyon explained this is because open clouds are scalable, cheap and secure. He compared the evolution of cloud computing the the evolution of the internet, stating that although the web existed before open standards, it was the arrival of HTML that prompted the explosion of innovation that made the web what it is today.

“Lock-in is fundamentally a bad thing,” he said. “Beware of a cloud solution that’s fundamentally proprietary; beware of cloud solutions that are actually just virtualisation dressed up as cloud, they’re not the same thing – vCloud is not fundamentally where cloud computing is going over the next ten years; beware of cloud solutions that are only offered by one vendor, and beware of anything that comes from the high temple of lock-in: Oracle.”

Kenyon said the industry is moving towards a world where multiple public cloud providers will be competing on price, functionality and uptime. He pointed to HP's public cloud, which is built on OpenStack and will come out of beta this year, as well as Rackspace's plans to move its public cloud infrastructure to OpenStack.


Read More...
http://news.techworld.com/virtualisation/3333246/ubuntu-creator-warns-businesses-beware-cloud-lock-in/

All I have to say is... Who didn't see this Coming!???

Don


Most Popular in Virtualisation


Bipedal Cycling Robot Can Balance, Steer and Correct Itself - DigInfo TV - Tech News Videos From Japan | The latest technology, products, gadgets and scientific research direct from Tokyo

Bipedal Cycling Robot Can Balance, Steer and Correct Itself #DigInfo


Video Link...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mT3vfSQePcs&feature=related


Bipedal Cycling Robot Can Balance, Steer and Correct Itself

-
10

Robot creator Masahiko Yamaguchi has demonstrated a robot which can balance, steer and correct itself while riding a fixed-gear bike.

"A feature of this robot is, it pedals the bike with its own feet, and keeps its balance just by using the handlebars. I think this is probably a world first."

"I'm interested in artificial intelligence, and in that context, I think intelligence and skills have equal value. So my purpose in creating this robot was to pursue intelligence from the skills side. While I was thinking of suitable topics, my local science museum demonstrated a cycling robot. So I decided to consider cycling as the skill, and build a bicycle robot."

This robot system consists of a commercially available two-legged robot and a bicycle made by Yamaguchi. To detect how much the robot is tilting, the TAG201 gyro from Tamagawa Seiki is used. Based on the tilt data, a method called PID control is used to control the robot's balancing motion.

"There's a control board in the backpack. That needed to have a high processing speed, so I made my own board using the SH7125 CPU core."

"PID control is a classical control method. It's used to calculate how far to turn the handlebars when the frame tilts. By calculating proportional, integral, and differential components for the tilt, and adding them, the system calculates how far to turn the handlebars when the frame tilts. Also, the robot needs to decide which direction to go in, so we use a remote control to instruct it."

The system has two speeds. Because there aren't any brakes, the robot stops by taking its feet off the pedals and placing them on the ground.

Read More...
http://www.diginfo.tv/v/11-0247-r-en.php

Pretty Cool!:) Looks like it would be a Big Seller, as a Toy! Of course, like most other toys... the fun would only last about a day. Well, unless you could get good enough at the controls, to make it jump something or drive on a Loop-De-Loop Track;)

Don


Diginfo.tv
Bipedal Cycling Robot Can Balance, Steer and Correct Itself #DigInfo - YouTube
Bipedal Cycling Robot Can Balance, Steer and Correct Itself - DigInfo TV - Tech News Videos From Japan | The latest technology, products, gadgets and scientific research direct from Tokyo
DigInfo TV - Technology News From Japan | Videos of the latest tech, gadgets and research direct from Tokyo
Toyota's next-generation GRMN SPORTS HYBRID Concept II - DigInfo TV - Tech News Videos From Japan | The latest technology, products, gadgets and scientific research direct from Tokyo
Tajima e-runner Mini Sport EV - DigInfo TV - Tech News Videos From Japan | The latest technology, products, gadgets and scientific research direct from Tokyo
'Mayumi Special' Nissan Infiniti Q45 - Tokyo Auto Salon 2012 - DigInfo TV - Tech News Videos From Japan | The latest technology, products, gadgets and scientific research direct from Tokyo
Toyota Fun-Vii Futuristic EV Concept Car - DigInfo TV - Tech News Videos From Japan | The latest technology, products, gadgets and scientific research direct from Tokyo

Fukushima Robot Operator Writes Tell-All Blog - IEEE Spectrum

Fukushima Robot Training Exercises



Video Link...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=PUhCPuDbUjg


Fukushima Robot Operator Writes Tell-All Blog

POSTED BY: Erico Guizzo  /  Tue, August 23, 2011

 

Editor's Note: This is part of IEEE Spectrum's ongoing coverage of Japan's earthquake and nuclear emergency.

EXCLUSIVE: THE FUKUSHIMA ROBOT DIARIES

An anonymous worker at Japan’s Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant has written dozens of blog posts describing the ups and downs of his experience as one of the lead robot operators at the crippled facility.

His blog provides a window into the complex and dangerous work environment faced by the operators, a small group of young technicians who, like other front-line personnel, must approach areas of high radiation, deploying remote-controlled robots to assist with efforts to further stabilize and shut down the plant’s four troubled reactors.

The blog posts, which have recently been deleted, depict the operators’ extensive robot training exercises, as well as actual missions, including surveying damage and contamination in and around the reactors and improvising a robotic vacuum to suck up radioactive dust. The author, who goes by the initials S.H., also used the blog to vent his frustrations with inept supervisors and unreasonable schedules, though he maintains a sense of humor, describing in one post how he punched a hole in a wall while driving a robot and in another entry how a drunken worker slept in his room by mistake.

The material also raises questions about whether Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO), the plant’s owner, is acting with adequate speed and providing enough robots and supporting resources for the robot teams. It's ironic that, although the robots are remote controlled, the operators still have to work close to the highly damaged and radioactive reactors. There is no communications infrastructure, combining wired and wireless capabilities, that would allow the operators to do their work from a safer location.



Skipping on down...

Below are portions excerpted from nearly 50 robot-related posts that S.H. published on his blog, titled "," or "Say Whatever I Want * Do Whatever I Want," covering a period from late April to early July 2011 [right, screenshot of a post]. This translation attempts to remain as close to the original text as possible as well as preserve the author’s style and tone. The translated version, however, may have inadvertently introduced inaccuracies or altered the author’s views. Also note that we tried to preserve the formatting of the text; S.H. typically writes one sentence per line, grouping them together when they're related to the same topic. Some sections (marked with [...]) were omitted for clarity or space. Please report any errors to e.guizzo@ieee.org. And leave a comment below telling us what you think about the material.



Say Whatever I Want * Do Whatever I Want

POSTED: 26 APRIL 2011
Robot Team

Our new task is the operation of the exploration robots.
At some point we’re supposed to have domestic [Japanese] robots too [in addition to the robots from U.S. company iRobot].
For now there are three of us [robot operators], including myself.
The tsunami destruction inside the turbine building.
Mud all over, beyond recognition, a total mess.
To be honest, I feel as though we are fortunate that the building sustained only this much damage.
The nuclear reactor building is not as bad.
[...]
A program [to operate the robots] is needed, and we are going to use a Toughbook PC. The controller is the same as those for video game systems, like the PlayStation.
[...]
As we expected, that young employee is good [at driving the robot]!
Tomorrow the robots are off duty, so it’s my turn for training while their batteries are getting charged.
Apparently, they not only want the robots to be able to climb over rubble but also go up and down stairs, so we are just going to have to try hard and get the hang of it.
If you see anything on TV, it will probably be me behind the controls.
I hope to be in charge of the robot that is in the lead.



Skipping on down...

POSTED: 3 JUNE 2011
It’s . . . a . . . ghooooost!!!

As planned, we sent the robots into the No. 1 nuclear reactor for exploration.
We entered from the receiving bay of the building.
We settled into a rather low radiation area and operated [the robots] using the cameras and radio control.
I was one of the operators (one unit) today.
Because a power company employee said, “We will hand today’s images over to the media,” I think you will see the material, even on TV.
My robot, as usual, has had its alarm light on the head camera blinking on and off since yesterday.
I think you will be able to see this on TV: The robot with a red light blinking on and off on its camera is the robot I’m operating.

There is so much rubble and accumulated dust that the robots’ treads had quite a slippery time on the shellacked floors.
On the way back, to get to the receiving bay it is an uphill climb and the robots were unable to make the climb because it was too slippery.
We finally made it back by making running starts and finding areas with more grip by jostling the robot or by getting rid of scrap rubble that had slid under the robot, using the flippers to raise the body.

Today we ran the robots with the arm lifted up to the height of a person’s chest, on which a dosimeter measuring [radiation] is positioned.
At one point, the robot had to climb over a slope that was only the width of the robot, and there was a glass door that was leaning over after collapsing during the tremors. In that situation, we used caution and lowered the robot’s center of gravity to get through.
[...]
We put smear filter paper on the grapple (gripper).
The smear paper will tear if we put it on just like that, so we balled up a vinyl bag and taped it up like a sphere. Then we pasted the smear paper onto the spherical vinyl bag and placed it between the grippers to collect samples.
With the smear method, you can analyze the contamination levels and the nuclides.
Not to toot my own horn, but I’m gaining quite a reputation for my operation of the robot.

There is a place in the nuclear reactor building where a pipe comes straight up from below and there is steam shooting out of the floor like hot springs.
The temperature is around 33 °C and not so very hot, and the radiation level is about 60 mSv/h, which is about the same as the surroundings.
The humidity is about 56%.

As it happened, we found a hot spot.
There was a maximum of 4 Sv/h (4,000 mSv/h).
But that was just a momentary value and cannot be considered accurate data.
It fluctuated between 2 and 4 Sv/h, so we measured it as accurately as possible, and the data result was 3.2 Sv/h (3,200 mSv/h).
[...]
There’s probably some kind of pulsating ghost.
I think we will need to do an investigation of this in the future.
When lowering the arm to the floor surface, it was about 30 mSv/h.
That's a big difference, even at only a meter away.
[...]


POSTED: 15 JUNE 2011
Migraines

Today we had hands-on operator training for the PackBot (made by iRobot), with [operators from] both companies together from early on.
It was more like Ethernet testing than training.

We mounted an antenna and Ethernet-type booster onto one unit, and we hooked up a LAN cable to it.
We were expecting to go from the double doors of the nuclear reactor building to the northeastern stairs, so we tested about 45 meters [150 feet] of cable.
Can one robot unit pull the LAN cable?
Furthermore, can it return collecting the LAN cable by itself?
Because it does not have a reel like the optical fiber, the operator (sub) has to release or retrieve the LAN cable while the robot is moving.
In other words, this unit alone will become like a wireless base.
This one unit will go to the first landing of the northeastern stairs.

Then another unit (one from our company) will go down the stairs to the very lowest basement level (basement floor 2) of the building.
[...]
We will go as far down as we can go in the No. 1 nuclear reactor building on [June] 23rd and check on the situation of the contaminated water.
I turned down the operation on the 23rd.
I will give the responsibility to a senior colleague who had done this prior to me.
I decided I will be the navigator.

Today the Warrior robot from the same iRobot company arrived at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant.
For now, they brought only one unit.
Unless another unit arrives, it doesn’t make much sense.
[...]
Tomorrow we are going to do the operator training for the Warriors.
If we can shoot a video, I’ll do so.
It is just a voluntary operator training in the front area around our office, so I don’t think it should be a problem to shoot video.

Migraine headaches have bothered me since around noon.


POSTED: 16 JUNE 2011
Warrior

Today we had operator training for the Warrior from the U.S. iRobot company.
We went over basic operation skills and maintenance methods.
We tried climbing over rubble as well.

The weight is 250 kilograms [550 pounds] and it is six to seven times bigger than the PackBot we have been using.
It can even suspend itself.
In other words, in a vertical direction, it can lift 250 kilograms or higher with its own strength.
Apparently, lifting about up to 100 kilograms [220 pounds] is easily done.
It can move with people riding on it as well (a person of normal weight).

It is difficult to maintain its balance when going up and down stairs (or climbing over rubble), etc., because of its weight.
Of course, there were no instances of it falling over.
The basic control operations are the same, and it uses the same PC and game controller.
The button operations are a little different because the functions vary somewhat, but I didn’t get mixed up.

 

The height is about 3 meters [9.8 feet] max [images above].
Its speed is about 30 kilometers per hour [20 miles per hour], which is faster than the PackBot.

It covers more ground when going up and down stairs than a PackBot, but because its body is so big, I’m not sure it will make it around the stair landings.
We plan to verify that point tomorrow.
Unfortunately, I’m busy with my bus driving duties, so I won’t be able to attend the test.

The battery is the same as the PackBot.
The batteries for the PC and the robot are the same (1 battery/12 V).
One is used for the PC.
The PackBot has four, but the Warrior uses six.
For the PackBot the batteries were individual units, but for the Warrior, they are in a pack of six.


POSTED: 19 JUNE 2011
Isolation and Loneliness

Read More...
http://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/industrial-robots/fukushima-robot-operator-diaries

A very interesting and helpful stroy to share with the World. I was thinking that I hoped that the young Technician "S.H.", didn't loose their job, after Posting this info. But, then after considering the Dangers of being exposed to the Radiation and the seeming lack of adequate safety precautions taken by the Company Supervisors... Maybe I hope that he or she did loose that Job! So, that they can have a better chance of living to tell about it later!:O

Don

The Fukushima Robot Diaries
The Fukushima Robot Diaries - Hack a Day
Fukushima Robot Operator Writes Tell-All Blog - IEEE Spectrum
Fukushima Robot Training Exercises - YouTube

Thursday, January 26, 2012

HowStuffWorks Videos "Military Aircraft Videos"

Here's some interesting Videos on Air Craft of several types...

Don






Go there...
http://videos.howstuffworks.com/science/military-aircraft-videos-playlist.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+DailyStuff+%28DailyStuff+from+HowStuffWorks%29#video-31336


Tuesday, January 24, 2012

XBMC running on Raspberry Pi

Man, I would like to get a couple of these!:) Here I am working for the last 4 days on trying to get OpenELEC to install and run on one of my old PC's (XBMC doesn't have the my nVidia Driver). Now, OpenELEC looks great! But instead, I could be having me some
Raspberry Pi!

Don


XBMC running on Raspberry Pi

Read More...
http://www.raspberrypi.org/archives/571

XBMC on Raspberry Pi SCALE 10x 2012



Video Link...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=4NR57ELY28s


Getting ready for launch: kernel sources on GitHub



Plop Linux - LiveCD, USB boot, PXE network boot, antivirus, rescue, partimage, NTFS, tftp, avast, f-prot

I tried out ploplinux-4.1.2-i486-X for older Computers in Virtual Box and it is a nice looking little Distro, with a Gnome Desktop. The look and feel is much like older Fedora Live CD's. System requirements are "Intel i486 compatible processor" and "64MB of ram". I have an old P1, 166MHz with 64MB of Ram and a P3, with about 200MB of Ram. These PC's are the ones that I'm thinking of for this version of Plop. It runs great in the VM on 195MB of Ram and with a 1.8GHz Processor and Boot's very fast!:) I also downloaded and Booted the "ploplinux-4.1.2-X.iso" (the Regular full Plop OS) in Virtual Box. But it gave an error about needing PAE for the Kernel. I set VBox to use PAE, but that just Crashed VBox. So, if I want to try this one out, I will have to do it on a Real Box (Hardware System). I may put them both on a USB Stick and then use Plop Boot Manager to try them out on Real Hardware. Check out Plop Boot Manager on my Blog too. It's a very useful Boot Tool... http://donsdeals.blogspot.com/2012/01/what-is-that-little-plop-boot-manager.html

Don

Plop Linux


page update: 27/Nov/2011
Print version
Introduction
System requirements
Features
Screenshots
Download
!! Create bootable Plop Linux CD/USB device with Linux
!! Create bootable Plop Linux CD/USB device with Windows
Install to harddisk
F-PROT Antivirus for Linux
Avast Antivirus for Linux
AVG Antivirus for Linux
Backup/restore Windows with Partimage
Backup/restore Windows with fsarchiver
Boot from network (PXE, DHCP, TFTP, NFS, Samba/Windows network share) - Linux Server
Boot from network (PXE, DHCP, TFTP, Windows network share) - Windows Server
Xorg, Gnome, Fluxbox, gparted and more
x64 (64bit) version
Locale settings
Perl modules
Welcome text
C compiler
Ext2/3 instead of FAT
Splash screen
Special commands
Boot parameter
FAQ's - Frequently asked questions

Introduction


Plop Linux is a small distribution that can boot from CD, DVD, USB flash drive (UFD), USB harddisk or from network with PXE. It's designed to rescue data from a damaged system, backup and restore operating systems, automate tasks and more.

Current stable: 4.1.2

Next release: ploplinux-4.1.3-test2


Info: Alternative to the official usb install method, you can use following tools made by others:


System requirements


  • Intel i486 compatible processor
  • 64MB ram

Features


  • booting from CD/DVD, USB and network
  • Linux kernel 3.0.1
  • 32bit and 64bit versions
  • sshfs
  • NTFS read/write with ntfs-3g (except compressed and encrypted files)
  • add your own scripts
  • IDE, SATA, SCSI, and RAID support
  • Partimage to save or restore partitions
  • pimgrestore
  • proftpd server
  • ssh connections
  • samba connection
  • nfs connection
  • btrfs
  • vmstat
  • systat package
  • fsarchiver
  • mbuffer, udpcast, multicast
  • partclone
  • memtest
  • cryptsetup luks
  • tftp (tftpd)
  • xinetd
  • dhcp server
  • testdisk, photorec
  • Plop Boot Manager
  • nmap
  • perl
  • lilo, grub, grub2
  • chntpw, reged
  • chkrootkit
  • bluetooth
  • wake on lan (wol, ether-wake, ethtool)
  • lot of network tools
  • Linux F-PROT Antivirus from F-PROT.
    This antivirus is free for personal users.
  • Linux AVAST Antivirus from avast! Linux Home Edition.
    This antivirus is free for non-commercial use. You need a licence key to use it.
  • Network connections to windows network shares, ftp servers, web servers or ssh connections.
  • wine, mono, vnc, gparted, firefox, ...
  • Flash player, LibreOffice, OpenOffice

Screenshots


Boot menu

zoom
     Console

zoom
     Console

zoom
     Gnome

zoom
     Fluxbox

zoom

Download



Go there...
http://www.plop.at/en/ploplinux.html#system

Plop Boot Manager and Plop Linux is a small distribution that can boot from CD, DVD, USB flash drive (UFD), USB harddisk or from network with PXE.
cd boot to usb - Google Search
Boot From a USB Drive Even if your BIOS Won’t Let You - How-To Geek
DistroWatch.com: Plop Linux
Plop 4.1.2 Screen Shots - Screen shots of Plop 4.1.2 and Other Linux Distros
Plop Forum - Index
Plop Linux - LiveCD, USB boot, PXE network boot, antivirus, rescue, partimage, NTFS, tftp, avast, f-prot
Plop - Home
Plop - Documentation / Manual / Examples - Free Boot Manager, builtin usb driver, native usb, boot different operating systems, cdrom, usb, freeware, option rom bios
Plop Linux - LiveCD, USB boot, PXE network boot, antivirus, rescue, partimage, NTFS, tftp, avast, f-prot
Plop - Plop Linux
Plop - Plop Linux
Plop - Documentation / Manual / Examples - Free Boot Manager, builtin usb driver, native usb, boot different operating systems, cdrom, usb, freeware, option rom bios
Plop - Documentation / Manual / Examples - Free Boot Manager, builtin usb driver, native usb, boot different operating systems, cdrom, usb, freeware, option rom bios
Plop - Documentation / Manual / Examples - Free Boot Manager, builtin usb driver, native usb, boot different operating systems, cdrom, usb, freeware, option rom bios



What is that little Plop Boot Manager, that you see on so many Linux Live CD's - DVD's and USB Distro's?

What is that little Plop Boot Manager, that you see on so many Linux Live CD's - DVD's and USB Distro's? Well, I'm glad you asked!;)

I decided to check out Plop a little more today. I've messed around with it some over the years. But never did any reading on it or tried seriously to figure out what Plop's best uses were. But today, I was looking for a way to Boot to a USB Stick on a PC that Doesn't Support Booting from USB. I remembered that one of the Boot Menus that I have seen over the years on Live Linux Rescue or Multi Boot OS's, had Boot to USB in their Menus. Enter Plop. And yes it does and yes it can Boot my old P3 to a USB Stick. Pretty Cool!:) Now, several of the OS's on my Multi Boot USB failed to Boot, after Plop Started the Boot Process for me. But, that seems to do with the way they are written. I kept getting an error about the Medium having to be on one continuous Partition. I didn't mess around with them. Since, I was just wanting to see if Plop could Boot a USB OS on an older Computer. It did and now I'm thinking about installing Plop Boot Manager on my old PC's...

Don


Plop - Documentation / Manual / Examples - Free Boot Manager, built in usb driver, native usb, boot different operating systems, cdrom, usb, freeware, option rom bios

Plop Boot Manager v5.0


page update: 08/Dec/2011
Print version
Boot Manager News

1. Introduction
2. Features
3. Screenshots
4. Licence
5. Download
6. Harddisk installation
7. Start the boot manager from Floppy, CD, Windows boot menu, Syslinux, LILO, GRUB or network
8. The Boot Manager
9. Configure the Boot Manager binary plpbt.bin with plpcfgbt
10. Create your own ISO file with your modfied plpbt.bin
11. Configure the Boot Manager binary plpbt.bin with parameters (Linux Kernel Command Line)
12. Create a PCI boot manager option ROM (save in bios)
13. plpbt4win
14. PCMCIA CardBus - USB PC-Card
15. Disable the USB driver under DOS
16. Detect the USB driver under DOS
17. Detect the USB driver with syslinux
18. Hidden partition / Cleared partition
19. Hide a partition
20. USB info
21. Video dual boot install Windows XP and Windows XP
22. Windows XP and Windows Vista dual boot with hidden (cleared) partitions
23. Dualboot Windows XP and Windows 7
24. Using the Boot Manager as USB harddisk driver for DOS
25. NOD32 Virus report
26. FAQ's - Frequently asked questions

1. Introduction


The Plop Boot Manager is a small program to boot different operating systems. The boot manager has a builtin ide cdrom and usb driver to access those hardware without the help/need of a bios. You can boot the operating systems from harddisk, floppy, CD/DVD or from USB. You can start the boot manager from floppy, CD, network and there are many more ways to start the boot manager. You can install the boot manager on your harddisk. There is no extra partition required for the boot manager.

The Plop Boot Manager was written by Elmar Hanlhofer.

The current version is plpbt-5.0.13.zip.

Overview of install/start modes

Hard disk installation The boot manager will be installed as primary boot manager to your hard disk. No extra partition and required. The boot manager will be in the first sectors of your hard disk before the first partition begins.
Start from external media
Floppy
CDROM/DVD
USB drive
Its not required to install the boot manager to your hard disk. You can start it from those media and use the boot manager with some limitations.
Start from other boot managers
LiLo
Syslinux
Grub
Grub4Dos
Grub2
Windows boot.ini
Windows BCD
You can still use your prefered boot manager and additionally use features from the Plop Boot Manager (like boot the usb drive,...).

The boot manager can run in hidden mode, so you have for example an entry in your prefered boot manager to boot the usb drive and when you use this entry then it starts immediately without any additional menu. This can be useful for the usb boot function.
Start from network With help of pxelinux its possible to start the boot manager from the network.
Start from your bios as option rom You can store the boot manager as option rom in your bios. There is no need for any hard disk or anything else to start the boot manager. It can be used as PNP part of your bios or the boot manager can hook the INT19 to take control as first boot device.

2. Features


  • USB boot without BIOS support (UHCI, OHCI and EHCI)
  • CD/DVD boot without BIOS support (IDE)
  • PCMCIA CardBus support to enable boot from USB PC-Cards
  • Floppy boot
  • Different profiles for operating systems
  • Define up to 16 partitions
  • No extra partition for the boot manager
  • Hidden boot, maybe you have a rescue system installed and the user should not see that there is another system installed
  • Boot countdown
  • Hide partitions
  • Password protection for the computer and the boot manager setup
  • Backup of partition table data
  • Textmode user interface 80x50
  • Graphical user interface 640x480, 800x600, 1024x786, 1280x1024
  • MBR partition table edit
  • Start of the boot manager from harddisk, floppy, USB, CD, DVD
  • Starting from Windows boot menu
  • Starting from LILO, GRUB, Syslinux, Isolinux, Pxelinux (network)
  • It can be used as PCI option ROM in your BIOS
  • Access the whole USB hard disk (up to 2TB) even when the bios has a 128 GiB limit
  • You can run the boot manager over the network
  • Start the networkcard bootrom from the boot manager to boot from the network

3. Screenshots


Main menu


zoom

Main menu (textmode)


zoom

Profile partitions


zoom

MBR partition edit


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4. Licence


The Plop Boot Manager licence conditions for personal and non-commercial use:

This licence conditions are also used for the boot manager tools that are written by Elmar Hanlhofer and not released under the GPL.

  • The programs are free to use for personal and non-commercial use.
  • The programs are NOT free to use for commercial use.
  • The programs may not be sold.
  • The origin of this software must not be misrepresented; you must not claim that you wrote the original software. If you use this software in a product, an acknowledgment in the product documentation would be appreciated but is not required.
  • This software is provided 'as-is', without any express or implied warranty. In no event will the authors be held liable for any damages arising from the use of this software.


The Plop Boot Manager licence conditions for commercial use:

This licence conditions are also used for the boot manager tools that are written by Elmar Hanlhofer and not released under the GPL.

  • The program may not be sold.
  • The origin of this software must not be misrepresented; you must not claim that you wrote the original software. If you use this software in a product, an acknowledgment in the product documentation would be appreciated but is not required.
  • This software is provided 'as-is', without any express or implied warranty. In no event will the authors be held liable for any damages arising from the use of this software.

Commercial use licence price per computer / virtual machine: € 5.- excl. VAT. Order with the contact form.


5. Download

Go there...
http://www.plop.at/en/bootmanager.html#intro

6. Harddisk installation


There are many ways to install the boot manager to the harddisk. If you want run the boot manager without harddisk installation then see Start the boot manager from Floppy, CD, Windows boot menu, Syslinux, LILO, GRUB or network.

Warning Linux users: Install LILO or GRUB to the boot sector of your Linux instead of the Master Boot Record (MBR). The Plop Boot Manager is not a Linux loader and cannot start Linux without LILO, GRUB, Syslinux and similar!

The install program
Install program menu
Harddisk install using Floppy with a disk image
Harddisk install using CD with an ISO file
Harddisk install using DOS
Harddisk install using Windows boot menu (NT, 2K, XP, VISTA, Win7)
Harddisk install using Syslinux, Isolinux, Pxelinux (Network)
Harddisk install using LILO
Harddisk install using GRUB

The install program


There are 2 versions of the install program. Basically both versions do the same. The only difference is that plpinst.com creates a backup file plpback.bin to restore harddisk sectors for a complete boot manager uninstall. The second version plpinstc.com skips the backup part. You have to use the second version for installation from write protected media like CD's or if you install from network or any other boot manager.

The install programs are installing the boot manager always on the first harddisk of your computer.


Install program menu

Read More...
http://www.plop.at/en/bootmanager.html#installhd


Plop Boot Manager and Plop Linux is a small distribution that can boot from CD, DVD, USB flash drive (UFD), USB harddisk or from network with PXE.
cd boot to usb - Google Search
Boot From a USB Drive Even if your BIOS Won’t Let You - How-To Geek
DistroWatch.com: Plop Linux
Plop 4.1.2 Screen Shots - Screen shots of Plop 4.1.2 and Other Linux Distros
Plop Forum - Index
Plop Linux - LiveCD, USB boot, PXE network boot, antivirus, rescue, partimage, NTFS, tftp, avast, f-prot
Plop - Home
Plop - Documentation / Manual / Examples - Free Boot Manager, builtin usb driver, native usb, boot different operating systems, cdrom, usb, freeware, option rom bios
Plop Linux - LiveCD, USB boot, PXE network boot, antivirus, rescue, partimage, NTFS, tftp, avast, f-prot
Plop - Plop Linux
Plop - Plop Linux
Plop - Documentation / Manual / Examples - Free Boot Manager, builtin usb driver, native usb, boot different operating systems, cdrom, usb, freeware, option rom bios
Plop - Documentation / Manual / Examples - Free Boot Manager, builtin usb driver, native usb, boot different operating systems, cdrom, usb, freeware, option rom bios
Plop - Documentation / Manual / Examples - Free Boot Manager, builtin usb driver, native usb, boot different operating systems, cdrom, usb, freeware, option rom bios